Author: Alan

SB-811, a bill to expand the state’s heat-safety law

SB-811, a bill to expand the state’s heat-safety law

Op-Ed: California makes it too hard for schools to shield kids from extreme heat

State officials have recently approved a bill that would increase the penalty for violating a statewide heat-safety law, which requires schools and daycare centers to install heat-retaining windows and doors.

The original draft of the SB-811 would have increased the punishment for failing to comply with the law from a $2 fine to up to 180 days in county jail. But a revised draft that became the current bill passed the Legislature and will head to Gov. Jerry Brown for his signature on Tuesday.

The new bill expands the heat-safety law to require “temperature-controlled enclosures” on school and daycare buildings, a more ambitious and costly requirement that schools and daycares in the state can meet only with help from the state.

The law applies only to older buildings, such as schools or preschools that may have windows and doors that won’t open during extreme weather that is dangerous to children. Older buildings are already required by law to install heat-retaining glass, but the law doesn’t require them to do so.

The new bill adds new language to the heat-safety law making it a misdemeanor crime for a landlord or property manager to create a building or a business that is not in compliance with the law. The bill also expands the reach of the law with the expansion of school- and daycare-related exemptions to the requirement of “temperature-controlled enclosures” that go well beyond those provided for in the building and business code.

The bill also expands the reach of the law with the expansion of school- and daycare-related exemptions to the requirement of “temperature-controlled enclosures” that go well beyond those provided for in the building and business code.

The bill that passed the Legislature on Friday makes it clear that a landlord or property manager would be subject to up to 180 days in county jail if he were to create or operate a residential structure or business whose walls or roof does not have the ability to maintain a temperature that is safe for a large percentage of the building’s occupants.

“The bill that I’m supporting today amends the state law to include all residential structures and businesses such as hotel rooms and

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