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Michael Hawley found to have broken the laws of welfare agency

Michael Hawley found to have broken the laws of welfare agency

Judge rules Hawley-led agency broke record laws on purpose of getting rich

Hawley was deputy commissioner of the agency, which deals with welfare and benefits

The court found: ‘Hawley had been the subject of several complaints in the past about his conduct in office, including a complaint about his conduct as deputy commissioner’

The judge found: ‘The claimant had established that the Commission received evidence of a pattern of conduct by her that was prejudicial to her employer. But she failed to establish other facts which, considered together with the other evidence, demonstrated that the conduct was, indeed, a deliberate choice’

A judge of the Employment Appeal Tribunal has found a former minister in charge of a welfare agency broke the laws governing the agency.

Lawyers for former Department of Human Services Secretary Michael D. Hawley are appealing the ruling.

They argued there was no deliberate attempt by Hawley to break the law, but the tribunal found evidence which showed a deliberate attempt by the agency to break the law from the outset.

The decision came after a four-hour hearing in Auckland District Court on Tuesday in which lawyers for Hawley tried to persuade three judges to find there was not deliberate wrongdoing on his part.

But they found: ‘Hawley had been the subject of several complaints in the past about his conduct in office, including a complaint about his conduct as deputy commissioner, that a former colleague had made formal complaints about Hawley’s conduct, that Hawley had been advised to resign by his departmental advisers and that, prior to his resignation, he had been asked by a senior departmental official if he could be sacked.

‘There was also evidence about a series of letters issued in the course of the year in which Hawley, as deputy commissioner, instructed employees of the commission about the importance of complying with the Employment Relations Act and the Government’s code of conduct. He was warned that there were consequences of contravening the statute and that he could be dismissed.’

When Hawley resigned on June 1 last year, after just nine months on the job, he had been the subject of a string of

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