Author: Alan

California must move to a future driven by clean energy and carbon reduction, Stanford report says

California must move to a future driven by clean energy and carbon reduction, Stanford report says

California unveils plan to reach carbon neutrality by 2045

California is on track to become carbon neutral in 2030, meaning the state would achieve its ambitious greenhouse gas reduction target by then.

In a new report from Stanford, the environmental policy institute called on California’s legislature to enact a new law, or constitutional amendment, to do so.

California must move to a future driven by clean energy and carbon reduction, according to the report, which examines the state’s energy and transportation policies.

The report said policies in California are “disproportionately harmful to low-income communities,” noting that low-income communities have increased air pollution due to economic pressures from fossil fuels and transportation.

The most significant policy was the cap-and-trade program that restricts greenhouse gas emissions, the report said.

“California must shift to a future driven by clean energy sources and energy efficiency,” the report said. “California cannot achieve clean energy solutions unless it is prepared to spend substantially more for clean energy than it receives from clean energy.”

In particular, the report noted that California’s $54 billion annual investment in renewables will be “insufficient.”

To reach carbon neutrality, California must commit to spend $200 million annually until at least 2045 on renewable energy sources, the report said.

The state can be carbon neutral by 2045 if it reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent, instead of reducing them by 40 percent to 44 percent, the report said.

It concluded that California’s emissions must peak by 2015 and be reduced by 30 percent to 33 percent every five years before reaching a carbon neutral state by 2050.

The report also emphasized the role of the federal government in reducing emissions.

The report said California’s economic collapse was fueled in large part by its dependence on exports that generated much of its high-flying economic growth.

“This crisis is likely to persist and worsen for years to come. As it worsens, the state’s already poor air quality is expected to become worse as the state becomes more dependent on air travel and automobiles.”

The report also said that California must change how it manages its public lands and waterways.

“The state must ensure that land and water are protected, but that land and water, with their myriad of benefits, are also available for the use and enjoyment of all humans

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